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20121202
20121210
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the games? >> well, it's not clear that both sides know. the week after the election, president obama was asked do you have to have the higher rates or could we have deductions and credits and he said he was open to negotiations. three weeks later, after thanksgiving, he shows up and all of a sudden there's a line in the sand on rates that had come out of nowhere, so the president seems to be moving the goal posts in a deliberate effort, i don't know, to extract something, to push people over the fiscal cliff. something's going on and it's not clear because he's not where he used to be. he's quadrupled the amount of taxes he demands. he now has to have rates instead of just numbers. it's going to be interesting what he is doing but it appears he's not trying to come to any agreement. his position is one that the senate, the democratic senate, has rejected in the past. >> robert reish, 60% of americans according theo a new c news/"the washington post" poll believes they should raise taxes on those over $250,000 a year. presume b presumably president obama has seen these polls. so if th
elected to go to washington and get things done can't seem to make any progress at all on the looming fiscal cliff. instead, what we have is a game of finger pointing, both democrats and republicans, what else, blaming each other for the lack of a deal. now, keep in mind time is of the essence here. automatic tax hikes and spending cuts will go into effect in just four weeks if your members of congress can't come together and do a deal. on paper, it shouldn't be too hard. it's the job the american people elected them to do and the american people expect results. they want compromise. in fact, two separate cnn/orc polls, in those polls, an overwhelming number of people, 72%, said both sides should do a better job working together in general. so the people, that's you, want compromise. yet this is how the men and women on capitol hill, the men and women you elected to work for you, have responded over the last 48 hours. >> i think we're going over the cliff. >> it's unfortunate that the white house has spent three weeks doing basically nothing. >> what we can't do is sit here trying to
can get this sorted out, you can really move forward, and therefore, i think now that your elections are out of the way, i'm just speaking as an outsider, now your election is out of the way, there's going to be all this bargaining and positions, but my expectations, i hope, and the desire of the world, is sorted out, and we can move on, and then sort our own problems out. >> for those of us in the united states, we see sort of what seems to be two intractable issues. republicans saying we will not raise taxes on the top 2% of earners. the democrats say we're certainly not going to have cuts that hurt spending cuts that hurt the middle class. and as the proposals go on the table they seem intractable on it. >> they do. but you would expect them, the republicans to be more on the tax side and democrats to be more on the we're not cutting spending side. this is pretty routine type of argument. the question is, you know, are they so far apart they can't bridge the gap? i think they could bridge the gap. you know, there have been proposals put forward on a cross-party basis before that v
the election, romney's stayed mostly out of the spotlight and pretty quiet. he and paul ryan met with president obama in washington last week. >>> witnesses say it was terrifying, a crushing tunnel collapse about 50 miles west of tokyo. authorities have recovered nine bodies, most of them from burned vehicles. experts say aging parts in the tunnel could be to blame. the disaster has prompted japanese officials to order emergency inspections of dudsens of other tunnels with similar designs across the country. >>> and here's a sign of the times. the pope is on twitter. the vatican today revealed pope benedict's personal handle is @pontifacts. the vatican said the pope believes the catholic church must be present in the digital arena. that's going to be hard to answer a question about faith in 140 characters. >> he'll probably have 1 million followers in two hours. >> he has more than 230,000 followers and he hasn't even had a single tweet. his name means bridge builder in latin. another name for the pope. >> yeah. i'll follow him. >> i will as well. >> are thank you very much. maybe if i follow h
this election. it's not like the debt ceiling debacle in 2011 went over well with the american public. the american public was disgusted by it, it was brinks manship that people did not like to see, in a recession, they thought it endangered the economy, republicans also know that if you look at the polls and they look at the polls, that the public would blame them if we go over the fiscal cliff by a 2 to 1 margin. so i would say that right now, and i think even republicans would stipulate this, wolf. the president has the leverage here, i mean, republicans also know that if they were to go over the cliff that the tax cuts on the wealthy would increase. you could come back and undue the tax cuts on the middle class expiring. but the president's in a pretty good bargaining position here, which is why you see him sort of hold firm. >> what leverage do the republicans have? >> well, look, i think it -- they understand that for some liberals going over the cliff is okay, because liberals say, you know what, we get those defense cuts we wouldn't get otherwise, and they believe the public w
? election coming up? what happened in the u.n.? what's the feeling there? >> well, certainly the israelis have made no secret of the fact that this is a direct punitive measure for what happened at the u.n. last thursday where, of course, the palestinians managed get an upgraded status there in the u.n. general assembly going to nonmember observer state. of course, the word state there is the operative one for the palestinians. the palestinians now say they do, in fact, have a state which is a taertory that is defined as the west bank, gaza, and east jerusalem. so, therefore, the palestinians are saying that this obviously would make the implementation of this state all but impossible because they say it would be impossible for them to even reach their capital that they want to have, which is, of course, east jerusalem. this is certainly a measure that's cause aing lot of international controversy. you were saying that great britain and france have already put out staunch statements aimed at the israelis. the israelis are saying, yes, all these countries have voiced their concern. they're
still need to see the full impact of sandy. also with the election over, there aren't any sort of bigger imt implications for the presidential race. because the numbers are so foggy, the federal reserve isn't likely to look at this number as a real trend maker. the central bank. it's already said it keeps stimulating the economy even after the labor market gets better. we know this isn't likely going to steer the central bank in one direction or another. you flip the coin over, though, you have this people who say this report is very important. it's going to be driving the conversation on the fiscal cliff. we only have 25 days until the tax hikes and spending cuts start to take effect. here is the thing. this number came in much better than expected, don. so the bad part about this is that it may not motivate all those politicians on capitol hill as much as it may have, if it came in much weak er. this may not light the fire, so to speak. that could be the downside to the upside surprise to the number. don? >> alison, stick around. we'll get back to you as well. >>> from wall street now
to the people who can actually get us elected president in the next presidential campaign and that would be the middle class. and also appeal, trying to appeal in the long-term to those minority voters. the fascinating statistic to me out of this entire election, brooke, was that in 2008, 74% of the electorate was white. this time that went down two points and those two points, one could argue, handed the president re-election and the republican party needs to figure out a way to broaden, not to narrow itself, and that's what these two men are talking about, and that's what the debate on capitol hill is about. >> gloria borger, thank you very much. >> sure. >>> america's leading dictionary publisher has announced its list of the top ten words of the year. so this list is actually based on the volume of how many people are searching for words at merriam-webster.com. number four here, the number four search word, marriage. number three, bigot. and the top two words after the break. think about what's happened this year, could you guess the top two words? that's next. if you think running a
? he was just re-elected. why couldn't he put together a package, a deal to avoid this disaster? >> i think this is a question of political leadership. and as that poll showed, there's no doubt that the president has the political advantage going into this. but at some point, and i think we're kind of getting close to it, the president has to be able to pivot and to say how do i turn this political advantage into a real policy accomplishment? and, wolf, i don't think you're going to do that with continued campaign style events like we just saw meeting with middle class families. okay. we get that. that occurred during the campaign. the white house has clearly gotten its message out. i think now there has to be a next step. you know, timing is everything in politics. and this is absolutely no different. what i'm getting from talking to some democrats on the hill is i think there's actually a lot of pent up anger and frustration among democrats how they feel republicans were obstructionist for the last four years. there's a little bit of payback going on here. they've got the advantage.
. rick warren tweeted this. susan rice's appalling words when she put election politics ahead of stopping the genocide in rwanda. before that tweet was delete ed -- a 2002 article that claims she said this. if we use the word genocide and are seen as doing nothing, what will be the effect on the november election? elyse, does the criticism against rice add up do you think? >> i don't think 100%. susan rice was director for u.n. affairs at the national security counsel at the time of the genocide. the rwanda genocide. now, that office dealt more with the united nations than with africa, even though the united nations was dealing with the issue. at the time, it was a working level staff position. her first in government. ambassador rice could make announcements, but wouldn't be involved in making such an important decision about getting involved militarily in rwanda and president clinton said he made the decision. it was the greatest mistake of his presidency. and susan rice traveled to rwanda shortly after the genocide and said seeing the horrors of rwanda, the ground littered with hundred
. susan rice's appalling words when she put election politics ahead of stopping the again side in rwanda. before that tweet was deleted. a 2002 article claims rice said this. if we use the word again side and are seen as doing nothing, what will be the effect on the november congressional election? our foreign affairs reporter is out front tonight. elise, does the criticism against rice add up, do you think? >> i don't think 100%, soledad. susan rice was director for u.n. affairs at the national security council at the time of the again side, the rwanda again side. that office dealt more with the united nations than with africa, even though the united nations was dealing with the issue. at the time it was a working level staff position. her first in government, ambassador rice could make announcements at that level, but wouldn't be involved making an important decision getting involved militarily in rwanda. president clinton said he made the decision, it was the greatest mistake of his presidency, and ambassador rice travelled to rwanda after the again side. she said seeing the ground li
reaction? >> i think that's reckless talk. >> you said before the election you would be able to prevent tax hikes on all americans said flatly taxes are not going up. do you still believe that to be the case? >> listen, raising tax owes small businesses is not going to help our economy and it is not going to help those seeking work. there -- i -- came out the day after the election to put revenues on the table, take a step towards the president, to try to resolve this. when is he going to take a step towards us? >> do you see some way you can agree to tax rate increase and protect small businesses at the same time? going with the 37% or some middle ground -- >> there are a lot of things that are possible to put the revenue of the president seeks on the table. none of sit going to be possible. the president -- insists on his position. insist on my way or the highway. that's not the way to get to an agreement that i think is port-au-prince the american people and very important for our economy. thanks. >> there you go. speaker always short and sweet and had that intention of coming out at 11:
's suggestion that these are really big issues and very big decisions that should be made by our elected representatives in the senate and in the house. i'm not sure i like this idea that the president and the house majority leader, a republican, get to meet behind closed doors and get to make enormous fiscal decisions just between the two of them. >> do you think more would get done if they did this in front of the cameras? >> i actually think it should be one extreme or the other. they should either lock them behind closed doors until they get something done, let them hash it out, and then come out and announce the deal that we're not going to go over the fiscal cliff, or put everything on television. because i don't think i thought i would ever say this, but i do agree with grover nordqvist that this could give a hint about what each party is doing and who they are protecting. i think the democrats and the president would come out looking good on this, because from the very beginning they have said that they want to protect the middle class, extending middle class tax cuts. frankly, t
, the former companisy campaign manager of president obama's re-election campaign. howard kurtz the host of "cnn's reliable sources" lauren ashburn, republican from texas, congressman jeb hensarling with us, randy weingarten, president of the american federation of teachers. all guests this morning. wednesday, december 5th, and "starting point" begins right now. >>> our "starting point" this morning, president obama putting his foot down. he says no tax hikes for the wealthy, no deal. america hits that fiscal cliff in 27 days and that means tax hikes and deep spending cuts if the democrats and the republicans can't come together in some kind of a deal and with just ten days remaining until congress is scheduled to go home for the holidays, the clock ticking. here's what he told bloomberg news. listen. >> we're going to have to see the rates on the top 2% go up and we're not going to be able it to get a deal without it. >> we start this morning with white house correspondent dan lothian, he's in washington, d.c. okay. so who's got the ball in their court at this point then, dan? >> well,
-sex marriage to date. exit polls of last month's elections show that a slight majority of voters think that gay marriage should be legal in their states. >>> moving on now. rain, wind and snow are hammering the west coast. three separate storms in just one week have soaked oregon and washington and northern california. by the way, northern california has been hammered the worst and guess what. a fourth storm is on the way. a lot of areas already dealing with really bad flooding and they thought this was the worst of it. >> this thing just went up fast. real fast. fire department was out here. and got a lot of stuff, you know, away from the house so it didn't float down the road and stuff but this is the worst. >> meteorologist chad myers joins us now at the weather center in atlanta. round four. >> yes. >> this seems just cruel. >> and it gets worse. there will be six more rounds in the next 16 days. i can't stress how much rain that's going to -- once you get rain on the ground like we have now, it doesn't just evaporate and run off. it does run off but doesn't just go away. adding to injury.
young people. we're really just focused on the elect officials who seem to be doing a lot of nothing. >> morale is so low for my generation. because they feel like no matter what, nothing is going to get done. and they speak in a language that they don't understand. i do it for a job, so i know about it, but my friends feel like they have no idea what's going on. >> and this cynicism is really strong. because i think they feel, you know, 27 days to go and they just assume nothing is going to happen for the next three weeks. and they look at the countdown clocks on television news networks like this one and say, oh, well, nothing's going to happen until we go over the cliff. i don't have tune in or worry about it. >> i wonder if that dancing 84-year-old senator is a way to break through. >> we're the ones who will be the most affected by it. we're getting the $16 trillion deficit passed down to us. >> do you think young people get that, though? do you think they understand the long-term consequences? >> not like they should. >>> still ahead this morning on "starting point," they're an
-sex marriage should be legal. 46% say illegal. and on election day, voters in three states approved same-sex marriage. "outfront," mckay coppins, tim carney and maria cardona, cnn contributor and democratic strategist. this is kind of big news in all of this. tim, you saw the polls. now the supreme court will get involved in this. should this signal something to the republican party? should they say it's reached this level, we need to rethink our position on this? >> polls are one thing. there's also the fact most states don't have gay marriage yet and most of those that do, it was not put in by the will of the people. i'm a marylander. we did -- our state did vote for gay marriage. most of them had to do with judges ruling. if the supreme court does for gay marriage what it did for abortion and roe v. wade and said, no, this is not in the hands of the people. we're going to say there's gay marriage, that would do a lot to fire up the republican base and could turn this issue on its head and it could become a big winner for republicans because they'd feel disenfranchised. >> what about t
affected by the fact that for the first time in this last election you have people going to the polls and actually voting to allow same-sex marriage as opposed to it coming from judges or legislators? >> i don't think justices sort of said the polls did "x" so i will do "y." in 1986, louis powell, the swing justice of his day, they had the first real gay rights case, and he said to his law clerk, you know, as they were sort of weighing the case, you know, i've never met a gay person. i've never met a homosexual. what is that like? now, he didn't know that law clerk himself was homosexual, but that was what the world was like in 1986, that a worldly, intelligent man could have thought that he'd never met someone who was gay. now, even the conservatives on the court couldn't possibly express a sentiment like that. and that's just reflected in how the court acts. >> what do you think -- are is there any way to read the tea leaves on this? >> based on my experience in the health care case, i am going to not do a lot of predictions because, you know, wrong is wrong. but anthony kennedy has
know, after this election, this issue is so ripe for the supreme court the jurisdictions are so split in their laws, many states recognizing same-sex marriage and performing same-sex marriages. some states not recognizing them. this is the perfect scenario for the supreme court to step in and ultimately make a ruling. there are over 1,000 cases, joe, in which federal laws are impacted by marital status. the time has come. it's ripe. prop 8 was on the doorstep for the supreme court. here we go. >> avery, we were trading e-mails a little bit a while ago. one of the questions i asked you was whether the supreme court essentially gave itself an emergency escape hatch with one of the cases it chose. can you talk about that? >> late yesterday, as you know, joe, the supreme court amended its grant of review when it said, we want to know about the issue of standing. meaning does the person involved in the challenge have the right to be there in the first place. if the court doesn't then what it means in practical terms is if you don't have the right to be in court, you don't have standing, th
, a recent gallop poll show 53%, highest ever, supports same-sex marriage. in the election last month four states voted in favor of same-sex marriage. 33 states in a row previously had voted against it, so the momentum is certainly with supporters of same-sex marriage, but where the court -- how the court responds to public opinion is a complicated and not always entirely predictable subject. >> when are we going to find out how the courts will get involved? >> they don't announce when they are issuing orders in an afternoon. it could be 2:00 eastern. it could be 3:00 eastern. that is generally the range in which we should fine out, so it could be 15 minutes away. it could be an hour or so. or they could put it off for another week. they don't have to announce it in advance when they're going to issue these sorts of things. >> we're standing by. we're waiting to find out. jeff, thanks. >> me too. >> good to see you. >>> how to keep astronauts from being exposed to too much radiation in space. our abundant natural gas is already saving us money, producing cleaner electricity, putting us to
on the ballot, proposition 8, california voted in a close election to overturn same sex marriage. same sex marriage was banned after it was briefly legal. the federal district court had a trial there, and said that law, proposition 8, banning same sex marriage, is unconstitutional. that was affirmed on appeal, that is now appealed to the supreme court and they will now decide whether proposition 8 is constitutional or not. >> when we talk about this as being a historical sort of review, clearly there were different laws passed at the state level. so now it is really up to the federal government to kind of step in and say, okay, this is where we have to come together on our thinking. >> it is up to the united states supreme court. not the federal government. the federal government, the last word they have is the defense of marriage act. and what makes this so significant is that the supreme court has not really engaged with the issue of -- of gay rights since 2003. nine years. that's a long time. the country has changed dramatically in those nine years. there is a new gallup poll out that s
of leverage comes in to play. he came out of the election, he says that he ran on this issue of raising tax rates on wealthy. he believes he is very much the leverage in this negotiation and so you don't see him budging. republicans see the little levers that they have in the debt ceiling fight. these are two separate issues but they're all coming together at the same time. welcome to washington. everything kind of comes together all at the same time unfortunately. the debt ceiling if it is not part of any agreement, regarding the fiscal cliff to avert the fiscal cliff they will need to take up this question of raising the debt ceiling come likely early next year. republicans see that the question of raising the debt creeling is where they have leverage in this negotiation. the president and democrats do not want the debt ceiling to be kind of -- raising the debt ceiling to be part of this negotiation. they do not want this on their plate come early next year. it all comes down to leverage. democrats see that they have the leverage here because look at most recent polls today. if you look a
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)

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